Harvard’s Avi Loeb says 50 microscopic spherules recovered from Pacific could be from ‘alien probe’

Date:

Share post:


A top Harvard physicist claims he may have uncovered remnants of an alien ‘spacecraft’ at the bottom of the ocean.

Professor Avi Loeb — the chair of Harvard’s astronomy department from 2011 to 2020 and now head of the Ivy League university’s ET-hunting Galileo Project —combed the bottom of the Pacific Ocean for two weeks in search of fragments from a 2014 meteor that crashed off the coast of Papua New Guinea. 

The meteor, dubbed IM1, is believed to have originated from interstellar space.

Using a magnetic sled, his team found 50 tiny iron sphere-shaped fragments, which he said must have been from ‘a natural environment different from the solar system, or an extraterrestrial technological civilization.’

Professor Loeb has been arguing for years that Earth may have been visited by interstellar technology. In 2017, an interstellar object named Oumuamua passed through the Solar System, and while most scientists believe it was a natural phenomenon, Professor Loeb famously argued it may have been of alien origin.

A top Harvard physicist may have uncovered remnants of an 'alien spacecraft' at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Pictured is what could be a fragment of the craft - or just a piece of a meteor

A top Harvard physicist may have uncovered remnants of an ‘alien spacecraft’ at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. Pictured is what could be a fragment of the craft – or just a piece of a meteor

The expedition follows his long-held argument that the cigar-shaped interstellar visitor Oumuamua, which passed through our solar system in 2017, was of alien origin

The expedition follows his long-held argument that the cigar-shaped interstellar visitor Oumuamua, which passed through our solar system in 2017, was of alien origin

After the discovery of Oumuamua in 2017, Professor Loeb theorized – despite much criticism – that more interstellar objects had likely whizzed past Earth.

He was vindicated in 2019 when a student discovered that a high-speed fireball meteor in 2014, IM1, also had interstellar origins, predating Oumuamua.

Air friction burst IM1 into flames in mid-air as it careened towards Earth, leaving a trail of molten iron rain droplets in its wake on January 8 of that year. 

The discovery that these interstellar iron fragments could be dredged from the Pacific with powerful magnets led to Loeb and his Galileo team’s latest mission.

‘Given IM1’s high speed and anomalous material strength,’ Loeb told Fox News Digital this week, ‘its source must have been a natural environment different from the solar system, or an extraterrestrial technological civilization.’ 

IM1, Loeb noted, ‘is actually tougher and has material strength that is higher than all the space rocks that were cataloged by NASA. That makes it quite unusual.’

He has not dismissed the notion that these mysterious iron remnants from IM1 could be the first hard evidence of a ‘spacecraft’ from an ‘extraterrestrial technological civilization’ to crash land on our planet.

The discovery of the spheres at the bottom of the ocean comes amid increasing congressional attention on UFOs. 

This week, Senator Marco Rubio revealed he had heard from high ranking officials that the US is running several illegal UFO crash retrieval projects. 

Loeb is heading home from the Pacific with 50 tiny iron 'spherules, recovered using a magnetic sled, which was used to comb the seafloor in search of what could be alien craft remnants

Loeb is heading home from the Pacific with 50 tiny iron ‘spherules, recovered using a magnetic sled, which was used to comb the seafloor in search of what could be alien craft remnants 

This fragment was found during Run 12  in the Pacific Ocean near the path of the first recognized interstellar meteor, IM1

Thanks to on-ship analysis via X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy, Loeb and his team have now learned that iron is the 'dominant constituent' of the IM1 meteor spheres' chemical make-up

The two findings of spherules from Runs 9 and 12 in the Pacific Ocean near the path of the first recognized interstellar meteor, IM1

Not all the fragments are sphere-shaped - here is another small fragment also made of  iron material

Not all the fragments are sphere-shaped – here is another small fragment also made of  iron material

Loeb and his researchers (pictured is one) worked for two weeks on a boat, analyzing what they had pulled from the Pacific Ocean

Loeb and his researchers (pictured is one) worked for two weeks on a boat, analyzing what they had pulled from the Pacific Ocean

Loeb spoke to Fox News from the boat to discuss the 50 metal spheres he had found during the two-week mission

Loeb raised $1.5 million for his expedition to recover samples of the likely interstellar meteor IM1 off the coast of Papua New Guinea

Loeb spoke to Fox News from the boat to discuss the 50 metal spheres he had found during the two-week mission

But whether the object proves to be intelligently crafted or naturally made, Loeb said that his group’s physical recovery of material from outside our solar system is already ‘historical’ and ‘successful.’ 

Loeb has courted controversy, as well as millions in independent financing, over his quest to identify outer space materials that could be evidence or artifacts of alien civilizations probing our solar system. 

Last year, scientists and classified tech with US Space Command confirmed Loeb and Siraj’s calculations on IM1’s interstellar trajectory, reporting in an official letter to NASA that they were 99.999 percent sure the object came from outside our sun’s reach.  

Loeb’s critics in the world of astronomy and astrophysics had expressed skepticism on this idea, as well as the professor’s theory that IM1 might be composed of iron metal, but they have also been proven wrong.

Loeb and his team have learned that iron is the ‘dominant constituent’ of the IM1 spheres’ chemical make-up thanks to on-ship analysis via X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy.

The findings are a solid rebuke to astrophysicists with Canada’s Institute for Earth and Space Exploration, who argued that their computer modeling of IM1’s behavior before impact ‘strongly argues against an iron object.’ 

Back at the lab, Loeb and his team will determine what the atomic elements and isotopes from IM1’s crash debris might reveal about the interstellar object’s place of origin or perhaps even its alien makers.

‘This has never been done before,’ Loeb said. ‘We never received a package at our doorstep from a cosmic neighbor.’ 

‘This could be the first time humans put their hands on interstellar material,’ he said.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

spot_img

Related articles

Coveted Chrome Hearts Hoodie   Exploring Their Allure and Availability 

The coveted Chrome Hearts hoodie has captivated fashion fans around the world with its unique combination of luxury...

Essentials Clothing: A Fashion Staple

Introduction Welcome to the ultimate guide on Essentials Clothing, Essentials hoodie, and Tracksuits! If you're seeking trendy fashion essentials...

Why Custom Boxing Gloves Are Essential for Injury Prevention

Afraid of potential injuries that can occur during intense encounters? You’re not alone! The fear of getting severely...

Why Personalized Boxing Gloves are a Must-Have for Every Fighter

Personalized boxing gloves are surely a game-changer for fighters! You can now opt for more intense and injuryless...